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a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
a collaborative flee to support the u.s. efforts and what is a very challenging and dynamic security humanitarian and diplomatic context. thank you very much for your testimony. we will take a brief break while the second panel comes. >> we would like to now turn to the second panel one today's hearing about mali and the path forward. our second panel will include mr. niikwao akuetteh and joining us live this is our first attempt at live testimony by google [inaudible] i suspect nobody has testified by this, the thing i didn't know existed. so my thanks to the technical assistance and the policy support of several very capable folks who made this happen. dr. fomunyoh you may begin and we appreciate your testimony today >> thank you, chairman to an and ranking member isaacson pivot on behalf of the national democratic institute, have the opportunity to discuss the political developments in mali. today crisis is two-thirds of the country which is humanitarian and has admitted for under 50,000 people. the political uncertainty in the capitol and the severe food shortage that is affecting the entire
the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily political will, and i say that with regard to both political parties and the solution that has to be forthcoming in the weeks ahead and the months ahead will require the leaders to first of all put our nation fi
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
today, so thank you. [applause] >> later today you can see a discussion on how u.s. debt slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could lead to a new phase of political and economic development. event is hosted by the american enterprise institute in washington. you can see it live, 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> i think people still love discovery. just the channel to the ability find surprises. every month or every year i giggle a little bit about some show that people are suddenly talking about that a don't think you could have ever imagined. if you come to me and say mike, i want you to choose honey boo boo, or the show with the duck guy, or certain food channel network, i don't think that if i had to predetermined that was my practicum i would've ever picked that. but the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them, let me do it into an environment and can go paddling kind of go paddling around in there, so defined, i kind of like honey boo boo and on watching it, i still think that's a huge part of the american television experience. and i
-- commander of the western flotilla and to general u.s. grant in the winter of 1862 because they work together to capture fort henry, for donaldson, and the tributaries of the mississippi river. then foot was on his own for a while working with john pope, and that worked out pretty well, too. when they captured the island in april 1862. part of this sequence of union successes in the spring of 1862 which then did come to an end, so if there is informal cooperation between the two of them it works pretty well. but as they see themselves as rivals, it's not going to work. >> look at halleck and grant in 1862. halleck is worrying about grant. >> give us a sense of the state of, the evolving state in terms of shifting and as 1861 most 1862 and sort of changes, radically in terms of enlistme enlistment. >> start with me? yeah, one of the things about the civil war, and i think it's particularly to the civil war navies, it's a tonic pivot point in history. things have been changing for some time. the telegraph comes in in the 1840s but railroads already expanding across the continent. but the applic
counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
school, served as a commissioned officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you, roger. i also have the distinction of two things. one, i read and commented on stuart and rick's book. i don't want to get any medal of honor for that. my name is in the acknowledgments, i found it today, so nobody's come after me yet. laugh and if you think it's insend yea -- incendiary now, you should have read the draft i read. [laughter] i'm one of the few lawyers who did not file a brief in the fisher case. [laughter] okay. so let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative action. the question in this case is did the university of texas violate the equal protection clause in connection with its undergraduate admission program, and did abigail fisher, was she injured by what the university of texas did? so i want to start by explaining a little more than stuart did about the admissions program and what it's supposed to do and what it's not supposed to do
in the state so you could get the common ballot. president, u.s. senate, state questiones. we got the word on that out as best we could. e-mail voting, for military and overseas voting. we expanded that to allow people in other states, pennsylvania, new york, we were getting hundreds of phone calls, i can't get home. to late for me to get a paper-absentee ballot. what can i do? the quote that hit home the most was, i lost my house, please don't let me lose my right to vote. i mean, that really hit home with us so we did whatever we could to get these people the ability to vote. >> you messenger e-mail. how did that work out? overall good? >> in general -- we're still doing the analysis of how, but at the time, again, being the situation that we're in, that was a tool that we used maybe wouldn't in a normal situation ball it was something that if we didn't do that, there would be hundreds or thousands of people that would not have been able to vote that day. >> do you think it's something you would consider more institutional going forward? >> i'm not going to comment on that. [laughter] >>
howard koh. he served as the assistant secretary of health for the u.s. department of health and human services after being nominated by the senate in 2009. he oversees a number of officers, including the office of the surgeon general and serves as a senior public health advisor to the secretary of health and human services. with that, doctor howard koh. [applause] >> thank you very much, doctor stein, for inviting me to this very important conference. i would like to express my gratitude to you and doctor nora volkow for her leadership. thank you all so much for being leaders in this very important part of public health. a special thanks to doctor johnson. it is a great pleasure for me to be here for in examining the results being unveiled today, we should remember that of all these agents, the tobacco remains the leading cause of premature and preventable death in the united states. smoking kills more than 1200 americans every day. for every tobacco related death, there are two new replacement cigarette smokers under the age of 26. it is tragic these replacement smokers are kids who
to cut u.s. ambassador christina and three other americans. the report cited systemic failures, leadership and management efficiencies and inadequate security at the conflict facility. three state department officials including eric boswell, assistant secretary of state in diplomatic security have resigned in the wake of the report. next, senators on the foreign relations committee who received the report speak to reporters. how not [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible] >> my understanding is that the standard with which the accountability board looks at people is a very high standard called breach of duty. but there's no question that there were people within the state department that were missed and did not execute in an appropriate way. there is also some cultural issues and i mean, there were no doubt a number of problems. i would just say to that end, i know that secretary clinton was unable to be able to testify in an open setting. i do think it's imperative for all concerned that she testify prior to any changing of the machine. i think that is
of strong missile defense, and more than any other senator he helped ensure that the u.s. had a working nuclear arsenal after the cold war had ended, because in his view, a strong america that can deter a threat is always the best avenue to peace. over the past decade jon has applied that same standard to the war on terror, and no one -- no one has worked harder to explain the threat of islamic terrorism or help equip our nation with the tools we need to confront and defend it than jon kyl. not enough thought has been given to the role of nuclear weapons in american foreign policy and how strategy will evolve as our conventional military is drawn down due to a diminishing investment and how nuclear weapons will be employed to support the articulated strategic pivot to the asian pacific theater. the senate and the country will be well served by jon's thoughts on these challenges over the coming years. fortunately, he's thought ahead by encouraging others to step into the void after he leaves. throughout his time in washington jon has been guided, as he explained in eloquent detail yester
" launched its own e-book called u.s.a. tomorrow. a publisher that any stripe can come to market very early in the timely topics of a political nature as the election season really showed, they could get the news out in a wider way within the e-book than if they had to wait several months or a year for work. i >> host: i thought michael grunwald new book, the new new deal should've gotten more attention than it did. i found it very and she seen it was not the kind of stuff you are reading the newspapers or magazines or seen discussed in tv. grunwald writes for "time" magazine. he's a nonpartisan and it's an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years fro
.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for their intellectual property and our farmers will have new tools to fight unscientific trade barriers. if we pass pntr, american exports to russia are expected to double in five years. this bill has strong enforcement provisions to help ensure that american farmers, ranchers, businesses and exporters get the full benefit of pntr. and this bill has strong human rights provisions. senator cardin's magnitsky act
. shadi, there was an article i think on friday in which unnamed u.s. officials were suggesting that morsi might've learned from the last couple of weeks that winner take all is not the way to go and that he needs to reach out to his political opponents. do you think that the brotherhood understands this referendum as in part a referendum on the way it's running politics in egypt? >> to some extent, yes. but i think there's a bigger problem here. the brotherhood is a full access to some of the they are extremely paranoid. they believe the opposition is out to destroy them. they think liberals are anti-democratic and out to bring down who they view to be elected and legitimate elected president. so they're very much in that mode of thinking. and that's what essentially one of their justifications for the authoritarian november 22 decree is, rather leaders told me this is yes, we know it looks bad, we know it's kind of anti-democratic, but the no rules of politics are suspended until future notice because we are in this fundamental turning point. and this is what we have to do. sorry if peop
atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populace cities in the u.s. in 1810, is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state university of new york, the albany the law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and wha
in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome dean alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you, roger. i also have the distinction of two things. one, i read and commented on the book, i don't want to get any medal of honor for that. nobody has come after me out. you should've read the draft that i wrote. [laughter] second, i am one of the few who practices regularly before the supreme court that did not file for the fisher v. university of texas case. [laughter] let's remember that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and on about affirmative action. the question is university of texas, did it violate the equal protection clause in connection with the undergraduate admissions program, ended abigail fisher, which he injured by what the university of texas did. i would like to start by explaining a little bit more than you would get about the admissions program and what it is supposed to do and what it is not supposed to do and what it does and does not do. we have the top 10% of his guaranteeing anyone who graduates in the top 10% from their high school class
present within families than other groups in u.s. society, sow how can it approach immigrants rather than immigration policy may be decisive. there was a great commentary, a republican analyst who said, the republican party did really well on latino leaders but not on latino followers, and if you look at it in fact the two governors were latino in this country are both republican. who of the three senators who are latino are republicans. republicans have not down so badly on recruiting latino politicians. we could not have said ten years ago -- democrats were on their ware but the republicans have caught up. and it's catching up relative the support they have gotten from the latino electorate. so is there a difference between latino leaders and supporters. does this look forward the fact that the republican party is getting ahead of the game and will do better in the future, othe fact the republicans have made inroads and still unable to attract latino votes and the converse for democrats. can the feel it's a strong base of latino voters or should democrats be worried that in the long ter
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
in. where they're in a fundamental mistakes that the u.s. president made? >> you know, i think on the management of this issue like i said we almost ran into a couple of issues here. but we kept it on the road. i have to say, because you know i think about the last 20 years, 30 years of u.s. foreign-policy, in particular in the last 10 years. i to call it the disciplining impact of working within the alliance. we were genuinely, because this was an alliance, both on the negotiating side because in order to deploy in these countries, government suppression had to take ownership for the negotiation. they weren't going to be sitting at the negotiating table but there was a group that nato called a special consulted the group that enabled these people to go back, the governments in question and say you are part of this process. we are not we are not going to let those americans do these things and i have to tell you there were so many people in the reagan administration that were unhappy hearing the state department arguments over and over again. we can do that because it will disr
and coordinate, these things like nepa, environmental permitting so that all of the federal u.s. dot agencies can serve as a one dot agency and streamline and find that the processes and environmental documents can be conned currently delivered and accepted from one agency to another. they are good at it. we have found some efficiencies and streamlining. i think we can expand that to federal rail administration and continued to great success. the other issue we have had is needing consistence guidance from federal rail on the buy american program. we wholeheartedly agree with and encouraged by america, manufacturing created in the united states, and to continue to grow our nation's economy in that way. at we are in a transitional period and we've had some challenges in trying to get waivers for as much as five months on a cliff for a real-time. that probably shouldn't have taken that long as we're in this transitional period. so figuring out how to accommodate the goal by america but finding a way to get there in a transition period i think would be good. i know i'm out of time, or to enclose. i
the program i'd like to introduce the head of the effort, former u.s. congressman, former u.s. attorney for the western district of arkansas and former administrator of the drug enforcement agency, the honorable congressman asa hutchinson. asa? >> [inaudible] >> will you work with the -- >> thank you, wayne. one of the first responsibilities i learned at homeland security was the importance of protecting our nation's critical infrastructure. and there's nothing more critical to our nation's well being than our chirp's safety -- our children's safety. they're this country's future, and our most precious resource. we all understand that our children should be safe in school, but it is also essential that the parents understand and have confidence in that safety. as a result of the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, that confidence across this nation has been shatter ored. shattered. assurance of school safety must be restored with a sense of urgency. that is why i am grateful that the national rifle association has asked me to lead a team of security experts to assist our schools, parents a
is most important families in the u.s. and also from a person that works and education. and i have to say that this is but a microcosm of a whole nation that is speaking out and saying the congress needs to govern. solve this problem. senator harkin is corrected they created a problem and they can solve the problem let's get the house back to work and get a vote on a very reasonable way forward and let's make sure the middle class, the working poor, and all of the people in the nation 100 percent are cared for in the solution. that's the way forward for we the people, and i thank you very much for coming out today. let us continue our efforts to make sure that we the people can have our well expressed in a congressional decision that in this this foolishness and governs. thank you very much. [applause] >> the so-called fiscal plan that would result in tax increases and spending cuts taking effect new year's day which is tuesday. the newspaper reports that negotiations have shifted to the senate. according to the helpless senate republicans may accept a plan that extends tax cuts for incom
work, it would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> maybe but mostly because it becomes a grievance. individual grievances interfering with reconciliation with between countries. >> despite the fact that it was really jennings and some of his co-workers who followed through on the actual rescue that is why i would never say is fair to give dolley madison the credit because her patriotic impulse to make sure that didn't happen that led to the rescue of the portrait. if you go to see one of these portraits of george washington painted by gilbert stuart there is the one in the east room that is there today because of the action of jennings and others but also another one that is in the national portrait gallery. it is 95 inches high. you don't know until you look at it was an effort of work had to be to remove it from the wall. .. >> this event was par
looked out the day she said i think there is something when he was shown the design of the u.s.s. monitor because didn't get a ride in the nick of time to create the most famous naval engagement of the war? but i want to go beyond that because we have spent time in our time here at the historical society talking about that epic battle, that epic duel 150 years ago. but, he famously said it was the end of the wooden navy and the walls would fall after that, and then the guy that both of you right so much about in your books, and i think you both like camelot, not young or glamorous in his adventures. tell me what impresses you the most about the surrogate and then each of you has to tell me whether she really said it or he didn't say it. [laughter] >> the thing about surrogate, there are several things and i will start with a whole question of loyalty. one of the problems in 1861 when the war began as the officers enlisted them for that matter but in particular they had to decide whether loyalty laid. whether it was with the state or the national government and one clear difference in the
constitution one of the things they are told is the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution the made a number of crucial changes and one of them was that they had it won german executives and i believe was up a five-year executive term. >> professor, was there a lot of political insight during the war in the south? >> there were no political parties. none of the things that interest in the party is it quickly was on the ropes and never really materialized. there was political opposition but it was in a quick kind of format. theoretically, everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican ticket you couldn't vote for a lincoln and certainly in the deep south, but they were all aligned with the southern wing of the democratic party and aprendo war the opposition rose and some of the more profoundly opposed to the davis administration on very good grounds it was a federally concentrated power regime of the entirety of american history. one looked at the union government, the structure of the states and the federal government in the union in th
in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes there's a possibly in the future they are wondering why it isn't happening more quickly. >> so why are china, india, pakistan -- why are they where they are economically if they are on the cusp? what is going not right in those countries that's growing right here in the united states? >> pakistan doesn't have the momentum so they are in a different category. >> brazil, take brazil. >> again, the thing that constrains growth in every country and the symbol -- which i do and i go to places like the world bank and if i am invited
in 1876 and that was u.s. versus cruickshank, which rose out of the horrible massacre, one of the worst in the reconstruction. , with the whole war, blacks had tried to defend themselves in louisiana and were attacked by white crowds and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers on the grounds that they had deprived the blacks who were killed -- >> host: mna type issue. >> guest: didn't find that was the case. at that time we don't see any racial motivation at all to deprive blacks of their very specifically. in a kind of a side, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. so if there is any application that courts later extended that if it applied to anybody, who is the federal government. so it's a limitation on federal governments to tell certain classes. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted. but it only applied to the federal government unless specifically incorporated to the states. >> we didn't get on the second amendment until 2010 f
12 years until president ronald reagan, a knitted him as an associate justice of the u.s. supreme court. he took his current seat in 1988. in nominating justice kennedy to the supreme court in 1987, president ronald reagan remarked that his career was a judge in the u.s. court of appeals for the ninth circuit as a constitutional law professor and in private practice was marked by the devotion to the simple straightforward principle but we are a government of law and not of men. during the more than three decades on the bench, justice kennedy has played an interpol role in the consideration and the decision of some of the most significant cases and serious constitutional alleges in the nation's history. he's been a staunch defender of the first amendment rights, individual liberty against government intrusion and federalism. these are qualities of the constitutional series and we are honored to have the justice. heritage to provide this evening's lecture. please join me in welcoming the honorable anthony kennedy. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. good afterno
coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> a survey by the national institute on drug abuse shows that drinking and cigarette smoking was down among high school students in 2012 but marijuana use remains high. the director also noted that abuse of at roll was -- attar old was with also a concern. >> every year we do a survey of the future. >> indicators that are not changing and indicators that are showing there was a positive side. i'm going to side with those on the negative side because i think we need to pay attention to them in order to be able to prevent from continue to go up, and that relates to the marijuana use. over the past five years, we've seen significant increases in the use of marijuana among teenagers, high school students, eighth, tenth and twelfth graders, and, indeed, we have significantly high levels of daily use of marijuana. according to
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
next on booktv, robert watson looks at the history of scandal surrounding the intimate lives of u.s. presidents since 1789. this is a little under one hour. [applause] >> okay, can everyone hear me okay? i am robert watson. thanks for coming. welcome to lynn university, site of the third and final presidential debate this past the over 20 seconds and a quick note on some of those awards that i won for specific specific education. the topic i will be discussing today is not the topic -- such is the point of clarification. that is black history month are women's history month or presidents' day. we are we are going to talk about my new book, "affairs of the state" and what i was trying to get at with the book was that rather than just tell stories about presidential history, the book is not just about the whodunit, but who did it and who didn't do it or with whom. i have tried to find a new lens and a new way of setting presidential characters. for example 12 years ago i read a book on the first lady and i thought it would be important to understand the presidents from a different ang
in a ruling in 1876. that was u.s. versus cookshank, which arose out of a horrible massacre. one of the worst in the reconstruction period, where a whole -- hundreds or more, blacks, had tried to defend themselves in louisiana, and were attacked by a white crowd, and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers. on the grounds they had deprived the blacks who were killed of their right -- >> amend. >> guest: -- the supreme court didn't find that was the case. it said at that time we don't see there was any racial motivation at all here to deprive blacks of their rights specifically, and in a kind of aside, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. and so if there was any application, courts alert extended from that to say if it was depriving anybody, it was the federal government. so i was a limitation on the federal government. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted by the courts. only applied the federal government unless it was specifically inco
was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litigation because jefferson didn't act on it quickly enough. he had in his hand a letter from kosciuszko saying that whatever you may for here from europe, might intention for my american funds remains fixed, meaning that kosciuszko, that his intentions to have that money used by mr. jefferson to free mr. jefferson slaves remains fixed. now, if mr. thomas jefferson walked into the county courthouse carrying kosciuszko's will, caring and letter from kosciuszko business i want is acted upon, do you think the court is going to delay? well, only because jefferson didn't press it. he didn't want to press it. anything else? billy speakers access to money -- [inaudible] income were going to john barnes account on which jefferson help held
by a team from the u.s. army air corps, a warplane so that guaranteed that somebody would finish. is that dangerous. there were several national teams trying to do it at this time. the good news was none of them were killed but then that bad news was none of them finish. it was actually quite difficult. in the early planes, the weather, whatever it was all the way around the world so there were these attempts to go-round, to fly around the world and in fact very quickly by the 1930's somebody does it within eight days. it's really kind of an amazing record. and it's hard to break that. if you go faster, it's not quite the endurance test as much as you would need to fly around the world. at what happens with that eight day record being set is people start to notice that it's not really what we would call a great circle, the equivalent is greater. people were sticking to the hemisphere where they could get that -- a million earhart said i'm going to do it around the equator as much as possible so she was doing something much more difficult that no one tested and that really was qui
the u.s. house of representatives." do you look for the books when they come out by members of congress or politicians? >> guest: i mean, i certainly note them, but i feel as if, at least from my stand point, that the books are a way to entrench members of congress, not just in their positions, but, also, potentially, to position them for future runs be it within their current offices or maybe something different so it seems as if it's more of a calling card than it is furthering their career as authors. certainly, being authors of books is yet another feather in the cap of politicians so it's just a way of announcing to the larger public that they are part of the larger conversation. .. >> we paid attention to the mark rubio book when he was touted as the vice presidential candidate then we lost interest. he has a future in the republican party. it will come back. >> host: well known for members and officials have written books including colin powell, madeleine albright another book "prague winter" and the late senator arlen specter had a book out in april 2020 -- 2012 "life among the
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
, for the u.s. government, he is part of that but there are things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder. where he for instance puts a ruler, a ruler underneath a rock that talks about, that has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled. and then you are thinking, and he is making fun of his survey captains but the great thing is, we don't really know what he thought and he didn't leave much at all. >> we will be done with him for sure. >> so we will open the floor to questions. jack, what is your question? >> hi. a great talk, really enjoyed it. a two-parter. is the -- still around and the historical preservation office? >> well, the agent block is still around. where is a? there is a conference about it recently, and maybe three years ago at the india house but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time jamie kelly founded at the aquarium that robert moses was knocking down, he got it somewhere. maybe it's the historical society. i don't now remember it is but no, should have contacted them. i called the borough historian but it did not take. yea
are placed. and so when he goes out, went also then goes out on surveys for the u.s. government, he's part of that, but there's things he is saying in the photos that make you wonder, when he, for instance, put the rover, ruler underneath a rock that talks about, but has an inscription in spanish that says when the spanish ruled, and then you are thinking come he's kind of making fun of this survey. but the great thing is, we do really now what he thought. >> so, we open the floor to questions. jack, what's your question? >> hi. interesting talk, enjoyed it. is the atrium block still around? >> well, the atrium block is still around. where is it? there was a conference about it recently. maybe a few years ago. but there are pieces of it still around. after the second time kelly founded at the aquarium that robert louis was knocking down, he got it somewhere. a historical site. i don't know now where it is. i know i should have talked to them. i called the baroque historian -- borough historian. >> i want to ask a question. does every borough had a historic? >> i think so. i think there's a
a matter of economic security as well as health security. in the u.s. demands for medical care is the social right originated in the workers movement who represented by people like florence greenberg. they next came to national prominence and fcr its proposed second bill of rights and finally they were adopted in the united nations universal declaration of human rights after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who hoped draft the u.n. declaration after her husband's death. today more than 70 countries recognize the right to health or health care in their constitutions. virtually every industrialized nation has taken steps to implement these rights by establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens. with one major exception. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. >> mother joan's washington bureau chief, david corn, his most recent book is called showdown, the inside story of how obama fought back cantor and the tea party. is the showdown referring to any specific incident or just politics in general mr. corn? >> will
opinions. >> what do you see as the greatest challenge to the u.s. constitution in today's society? >> well, i think i did touch on it earlier. in terms of applying the constitution, i do think it's the technology. i mean, think about it. all the dna -- dna's an obvious example. you can be exonerated through dna evidence. far more often it's used to convict and cocatch. and to catch. is it a search and seizure to, you know, take a little tweezer full of your skin and see if it matches something else? very, very difficult questions of that sort. surveillance, we had a case, i think it was last year or the year before, with gps. the police wanted to follow where somebody they thought was a drug dealer was going. well, you know, you could use, you know, an unmarked car and all that. no, just slap a gps on it, they have at the end of the month complete itinerary. and it turned out the guy was going into a particular garage that was known for drug use. is that an illegal search and seizure? the new technology is amazing. new satellites, people can read the questions you're asking if they're outd
of independence that we saw yesterday in the presentation and the u.s. flag that flew over fort mchenry. she will kill me for putting it this way, but prepare yourself for book history csi. [applause] >> it has been such an amazing privilege of the last two days to build the knowledge that has been brought together at the summit. it was discussed yesterday and seemed to be a continuing theme throughout that the resources of knowledge that leads to new christians, it can't be just information. it must be knowledge. in the preservation, in short of an interrupted exit either an original or reformulated form. very nicely ties in with the use of new technology and how we actually access that content. spectral imaging and other non invasive technologies we can access not visible information and change the information into content knowledge from our book. we can create accurate digital rendering of the intermission and make it more accessible in the digital object. the find it interesting because if we did not have the original material we could not use the new technology to pull up the informatio
there and to use these funds for increased security at u.s. embassies and other overseas posts identified in the department's security review after the benghazi attack making additional funds available for this purpose is one of the recommendations of the accountable -- accountability review board chaired by ambassador pickerring and admiral mullen. this amendment is a permissive amendment. it is not a prescriptive amendment. it permits the transfer of funds between the diplomatic program and embassy security, construction and maintenance at which would otherwise be precluded due to percentage limitations on such transfers. according to c.b.o., the amendment has no outlay scoring impact. we all want to do -- we all want to do what we can to prevent another tragedy like what occurred in benghazi. the state department has done a review and these funds will be used to expedite construction of marine security guard posts overseas posts to, build secure embassies in beirut, lebanon and zimbabwe. there is nothing controversial about this amendment. these are existing funds. there is no new appr
to make a comment, ask a question. go ahead and push your name tag up. the executive director of the u.s.a. folk all. talk to us a little bit about what you say football is doing in this area. before that come address the general question. is football serving the best interests of children in communities and how can it be improved? >> it is certainly striving for parents and kids. we all recognize this challenge is. we are at a point where we are learning. first i should think dr. cantu for raising this important issues. i believe we are all in this together. we're all looking ways to create a better for players. i hope we are and that is to provide accurate and whenever possible evidence-based data for appearance. we have to be careful certainly not to scare parents. my interaction with parents across the country as they are looking for frankly someone to say we care about your kids. we were taking action. we recognize challenges and were doing something about it. so virtually there's two sides as best as i can tell. there's a sports site in the football side and of course the science s
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